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The Nursing and Midwifery Council exists to protect the public. We do this by making sure that only those who meet our requirements are allowed to practise as a nurse or midwife in the UK, or a nursing associate in England. We take action if concerns are raised about whether a nurse, midwife or nursing associate is fit to practise.

It is against the law to claim to be, or Looking for practice date practise as, a nurse or midwife in the UK, or as a nursing associate in England, if you are not on the relevant part of our register. It is also a criminal offence for anyone who, with intent to deceive, causes or permits someone else to falsely represent them as being on the register, or makes a false representation about them being on the NMC register. Publication date: 29 January Effective from: 31 March Updated to reflect the regulation of nursing associates: 10 October All regulators review their Codes from time to time to make sure they continue to reflect public expectations.

This new version of the Code is substantially similar to the version, but it has been updated to reflect our new responsibilities for the regulation of nursing associates. In ing the register, nursing associates will uphold the Code. The current versions of our Code, standards and guidance can always be found on our website. Those on our register should make sure they are using the most up to date version of the Code.

For more information about the Code, please visit: www. The Code contains the professional standards that registered nurses, midwives and nursing associates 1 must uphold. Nurses, midwives and nursing associates must act in line with the Code, whether they are providing direct care to individuals, groups or communities or bringing their professional knowledge to bear on nursing 2 and midwifery practice in other roles, such as leadership, education, or research.

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The values and principles set out in the Code can be applied in a range of different practice settings, but they are not negotiable or discretionary. Our role is to set the standards in the Code, but these are not just our standards. They are the standards that patients and members of the public tell us they expect from health professionals. They are the standards shown every day by those on our register. When ing our register, and then renewing their registration, nurses, midwives and nursing associates commit to upholding these standards. This commitment to professional standards is fundamental to being part of a profession.

We can take action if those on our register fail to uphold the Code. In serious cases, this can include removing them from the register. The Code sets out common standards of conduct and behaviour for those on our register. This provides a clear, consistent and positive message to patients, service users and colleagues about what they can expect of those who provide Looking for practice date or midwifery care. The professions we regulate have different knowledge and skills, set out in three distinct standards of proficiency.

They can work in diverse contexts and have different levels of autonomy and responsibility. However, all of the professions we regulate exercise professional judgement and are able for their work. Nurses, midwives and nursing associates uphold the Code within the limits of their competence.

This means, for example, that while a nurse and nursing associate will play different roles in an aspect of care, they will both uphold the standards in the Code within the contribution they make to overall care. In addition, nurses, midwives and nursing associates are expected Looking for practice date work within the limits of their competence, which may extend beyond the standards they demonstrated in order to the register.

For the many committed and expert practitioners on our register, this Code should be seen as a way of reinforcing professionalism. Through revalidation, nurses, midwives and nursing associates provide evidence of their continued ability to practise safely and effectively. The Code is central to the revalidation process as a focus for professional reflection.

This gives the Code ificance in the professional life of those on our register, and raises its status and importance for employers. The Code contains a series of statements that taken together ify what good practice by nurses, midwives and nursing associates looks like. It puts the interests of patients and service users first, is safe and effective, and promotes trust through professionalism. The nursing associate role is being used only in England. Nursing associates are a distinct profession with their own part of our register, but they are part of the nursing team.

You put the interests of people using or needing nursing or midwifery services first. You make their care and safety your main concern and make sure that their dignity is preserved and their needs are recognised, assessed and responded to. You make sure that those receiving care are treated with respect, that their rights are upheld and that any discriminatory attitudes and behaviours towards those receiving care are challenged.

The fundamentals of care include, but are not limited to, nutrition, hydration, bladder and bowel care, physical handling and making sure that those receiving care are kept in clean and hygienic conditions. It includes making sure that those receiving care have adequate access to nutrition and hydration, and making sure that you provide help to those who are not able to feed themselves or drink fluid unaided. For more information, please visit our website at www.

As a nurse, midwife or nursing associate, you owe a duty of confidentiality to all those who are receiving care. This includes making sure that they are informed about their care and that information about them is shared appropriately. You assess need and deliver or advise on treatment, or give help including preventative or rehabilitative care without too much delay and to the best of your abilities, on the basis of the best evidence available and best practice. You communicate effectively, keeping clear and accurate records and sharing skills, knowledge and experience where appropriate.

You reflect and act on any feedback you receive to improve your practice. However, this support must never compromise or be at the expense of patient or public safety. This applies to the records that are relevant to your scope of practice. It includes but is not limited to patient records. For more information, please visit: www. You make sure that patient and public safety is not affected.

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You take necessary action to deal with any concerns where appropriate. The professional duty of candour is about openness and honesty when things go wrong. Prescribing is not within the scope of practice of everyone on our register. Nurses and midwives who have successfully completed a further qualification in prescribing and recorded it on our register are the only people on our register that can prescribe.

Human factors refer to environmental, organisational and job factors, and human and individual characteristics, which influence behaviour at work in a way which can affect health and safety — Health and Safety Executive. You can find more information at www. You uphold the reputation of your profession at all times. You should display a personal commitment to the standards of practice and behaviour set out in the Code. You should be a model of integrity and leadership for others to aspire to.

This should lead to trust and confidence in the profession from patients, people receiving care, other health and care professionals and the public. For more guidance on using social media and networking sites, please visit: www. This includes investigations or audits either against you or relating to others, whether individuals or organisations.

It also includes cooperating with requests to act as a witness in any hearing that forms part of an investigation, even after you have left the register. When telling your employers, this includes telling i any person, body or organisation you are employed by, or intend to be employed by, as a nurse, midwife or nursing associate; and ii any person, body or organisation with whom you have an arrangement to provide services as a nurse, midwife or nursing associate.

They must have the knowledge, skills and competence for safe practice; and understand how to raise any concerns linked to any circumstances where Looking for practice date Code has, or could be, broken. Throughout their career, all our registrants will have opportunities to demonstrate leadership qualities, regardless of whether or not they occupy formal leadership positions.

search criteria in the field below. Publication date: 29 January Effective from: 31 March Updated to reflect the regulation of nursing associates: 10 October A note on this version of the Code All regulators review their Codes from time to time to make sure they continue to reflect public expectations.

Introduction The Code contains the professional standards that registered nurses, midwives and nursing associates 1 must uphold. The Code should be useful for everyone who cares about good nursing and midwifery. Patients and service users, and those who care for them, can use it to provide feedback to nurses, midwives and nursing associates about the care they receive. Those on our register can use it to promote safe and effective practice in their place of work. Employer organisations should support their staff in upholding the standards in their professional Code as part of providing the quality and safety expected by service users and regulators.

Educators can use the Code to help students understand what it means to be a registered professional and how keeping to the Code helps to achieve that. Prioritise people You put the interests of people using or needing nursing or midwifery services first. To achieve this, you must: 5. However, this support must never compromise or be at the expense of patient or public safety 9 Share your skills, knowledge and Looking for practice date for the benefit of people receiving care and your colleagues To achieve this, you must: 9.

To achieve this, you must: They must have the knowledge, skills and competence for safe practice; and understand how to raise any concerns linked to any circumstances where the Code has, or could be, broken Throughout their career, all our registrants will have opportunities to demonstrate leadership qualities, regardless of whether or not they occupy formal leadership positions. Download the Code.

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